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Disseminating Art through Dharavi Lanes

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Disseminating Art through Dharavi Lanes

“Van Gogh painted The Starry Night while in emotional torment; Lennon and McCartney forged their creative partnership following the death of their respective mothers; Milton penned Paradise Lost after losing his wife, his daughter and his eyesight.”

[Source : www.huffingtonpost.com/christopher-zara/]

The other day, one of my friends asked me to listen to a peppy rap track by Divine ft. Naezy “Meri Gully Mein”, which was unlike any other Indian rap I had been hearing of late. It didn’t speak of consuming alcohol in large quantities, nor of going around with girls all day long. And on the same day we found this amazing dance crew from Kandivali, Mumbai “F.A.M.O.U.S Crew”, performing on Divine ft. Naezy’s rap.

The dance performed by these youngsters was jaw dropping. It spoke more than we could hear and made me feel more than I could take. The amalgamation of Vivian Divine’s rap and the dance was overwhelming and amusing for me, therefore, I researched a little and found out that this unique and rare dance form is called 'Krumping'“Krumping is a street dance popularized in the United States, characterized by free, expressive, exaggerated, and highly energetic movement. The youths who started krumping saw the dance as a way for them to escape gang life and "to release anger, aggression and frustration positively, in a non-violent way." - [source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krumping]. 

So what really led these youngsters from Kandivali to acquire this highly expressive and aggressive dance form?

Krumping is evolved through positive ventilation of aggression and oppression, whereas, the rap song “Meri Gully Mein” talks about the slums, the life of people living there and about the social inequalities, the less privileged go through everyday.

The performing arts are taking Dharavi's talent by the storm. Dharavi’s complete metamorphoses during the The Dharavi biennale and now all these artists, musicians and dancers having one common root - the slums of Mumbai.

But where is all this artistic inspiration coming from? Is it coming from the years of oppression, injustice and difficulties faced by the slum inhabitants? Is it really true that our millennial is rebellious and have now created their own way to take a stand against injustice? And if yes, then has the age of revolution reached the narrow streets of Dharavi?

In this blog, I won’t give you answers, but only more questions to contemplate.

                  “Perhaps it's good for one to suffer. Can an artist do anything if he's happy? Would he ever want to do anything? What is art, after all, but a protest against the horrible inclemency of life?”? Aldous Huxley

Watch these thought provoking videos below.

 

 

"Art comes from joy and pain... But mostly from pain." - Edvard Munch

 

 

 

[Image Source: www.i.ytimg.com/]